Saturday, January 12, 2008

Please Make It Stop

To quote Atrios, "The stupid -- it burns!"

14 comments:

Aldo said...

Besides being stupid, is that guy fucking color blind or are traffic cones a brilliant red in Canada? Anyone?

JP said...

I think they might be red and blue, actually.

b.orr4 said...

This type of myopic view is one reason why Canada will always be America's little cousin. There jealousy of anything U.S. is pathetic. And that's really all this is- jealousy plain and simple. If you want a mor eobjective analysis of the deal try this article:
http://www.thehockeynews.com/articles/12609-From-The-Point-Is-Ovie-worth-that-much-dough.html

DMG said...

I disagree that the league wants players like Ovechkin in big-time hockey cities - the Leafs, Canadiens, Rangers, etc are going to sell out and get attention no matter what, whereas markets that aren't as strong are going to benefit more from having a marquee player.

In regards to the Wings/Caps fans at the '98 finals - wasn't there some issue with Pollin selling a bunch of tickets to Wings fans or not offering them to Caps season tickets holder first or something?

Tyler said...

Besides, 1998 was TEN years ago dumbf*cks. Get over it.

bc said...

Well said dmg, the idea of putting biggest stars in the biggest cities doesn't work for the league overall.

Caps Nut said...

Actually, I think he's right.

Detroit isn't a Top 10 U.S. market, so all of those superstars need to be moved into at least a Top 10 city like Washington (9th)....

And while we're at it, what an embarassment it must be for the NHL to have the Canadian Diving Team Captain, Secondary Assist Cindy Crosby languishing in the 22nd largest U.S. market. He needs to moved to at least the 12th or the 8th in order for the NHL to really take off.....

TG said...

The thing that always gets me are those stories that talk about how maybe Leonsis will move the team to a a "better" hockey market. Let's see, he's got the right of first refusal to buy the Wizards and Verizon Center when Abe Pollin decides to sell/dies. Why in the WORLD would he move a team from the arena that HE WILL OWN to somewhere else? Do the writers just not do due diligence? Do they just not care?

Brendan said...

I emailed Larry Brooks this afternoon. I'm posting our conversation. It's nothing great, but it's nice to see he didn't have much of an argument.

Brendan Robertson to larry.brooks

show details 4:48 PM (1 hour ago)



Reply


Hey, Larry.

Would you like a spoon or a fork to eat your words?

"Ovechkin does not belong to the Caps. Through no desire of his own, he merely is playing for Washington under a three-year, entry-level capped lease that will expire at the end of this season. He never chose to play in DC so much as he chose to play in the NHL rather than remain in Russia after the lockout."

If that's the case, why did he sign a 13 year contract? It's clearly because he doesn't want to be in DC, right? Head over to www.japersrink.com and check out the template for your next article.

arry.Brooks to me

show details 5:16 PM (42 minutes ago)



Reply


My guess is that $124 million has something to do with it.

usually frustrated caps fan said...

To paraphrase the Movie Animal House: "Rick Brown - Dead!; Ted Campbell - Dead!; Marmalarde - Dead" or maybe Forrest Gup "Stupid is as Stupid does" would be better. I posted a reply to Campbell's stupid Hockey News article - here it is: "Mark (Posted 2008-01-12 18:01:45)
There's just so many uninformed people on this topic; you need to understand and look at the facts. First Ovechkin is going to make 10M a year wherever he plays in the NHL each of the next 3 years - as some have said the CBA and his talent assure that. He would have gotten that in an offer sheet as an RFA and the Caps would be fools to not match it. The 13 year deal isn't a bad idea on either Ovie or Management's part. No doubt the first 6 years are already insured if the league approves the contract. Second, if he gets hurt it's not a Cap hit. Smart money says each year Managment will insure another year of the contract as long as he isn't hurt so financial risk is probably at a max of 50 of the 124M right now. Second as far as a Cap issue if he's hurt and can't play they get the Cap room back. With OV in his 13 year contract the Capitals as a franchise are worth more than with almost any other single player in the league right now so that further lessens the risk from a financial perspective if you analyze it from a business investment Net Present Value aspect. Finally, he's the foundation of the franchise and last Thursday night I bet I wasn't the only season ticket holder who decided to reup my seats next year and for the next 13 years assuming I still live here. Get over it Canadian Hockey fans and be glad the schedule change next year means that regardless of where you live and who you root for over the next two seasons every hockey fan will have the option of seeing Ovie play the game. LETS GO CAPS!!!!!!!!!"
I hope Ted videos the toast he uses that ridicules all these guys when he drinks champagne from the Stanley Cup in the Caps locker room EVERY time they win it during the 13 year tenure of this great contract so we can all watch it over and over on YouTube!

Victor said...

That article sounds like sour grapes to me, and I don't even remember the Leafs being one of the teams in the 'running' (if you believe the hockey pundits) to acquire AO.

Also, I'm wondering what the guy is talking about. Does anyone remember a name-the-mascot contest? 'Cause I sure don't.

(And JP, your red & blue joke was great!)

Anonymous said...

"Flagship franchises are the key to any retailer – sports or otherwise. Apple Store and Nike World were created on 5th Avenue in New York," said Tony Chapman, a Toronto sports marketer. "The NHL needs to populate their flagship franchises with their top players."


Uh, actually, isn't the better strategy to grow the sport beyond the "flagship" markets? There is a limit as to how far the sport can grow (and revenues and hence the salary cap rise) without bonafide growth precisely in markets like Washington. After all, the "hockeytowns" of the NHL can only sell out a maximum of 40 games + playoffs...oops, I forgot...Detroit isn't selling out the Joe anymore.

Nevermind...

wilbur

Focality said...

What dmg and wilbur said. Sports leagues don't succeed by sitting on what has worked. Look at the NHL, especially its history concerning expansion, player contracts and the "revolution" that occurred when the WHA showed up. Ovechkin's contract in DC isn't just about making a hockey phenom happy, or bringing the Stanley Cup (and money) to Washington. It's about the continued survival and, hopefully, expanded presence of hockey in the minds of Americans.

Beyond hockey, the ABA really caused some changes in the NBA as well. Just as there were in the WHA, there were a lot of "crazy notions" regarding franchise management and recruitment of players. Many of those ideas changed the NBA forever.

It's unbelievable that these ideas of the Original Six or keeping hockey Canadian persist, or that business is business. Effective propaganda, I guess. But such thinking permeates hockey media, trickling onto the fans. They maintain these false sentiments, as if they're pure, good, and wholesome--and were the right thing to do. Each generation scorns the next (unless you're Sid Crosby), and how easily we forget the lessons of the past.

Anonymous said...

A "Sports Business Columnist". Never heard o' that before.